Graphic Novel Review: Thor vol.2 Who Holds the Hammer?

Synopsis:

The Odinson pops the question: Who is the new Thor?

The Odinson wants Mjolnir back−and that means uncovering the identity of the new heroine holding the hammer! As he narrows down the list of suspects, tensions continue to flare between the All-Mother and All-Father. As Malekith the Dark Elf forges his most dangerous pact yet, the new Thor prepares to face her greatest challenge: the unstoppable machine of death and destruction that is…the Destroyer! While the battle for Mjolnir rages on an unexpected character makes a shocking return−and the new Thor’s identity is revealed at last! Plus: Young Thor enters a drinking competition! The new Thor takes on a surprising foe! In the future, King Thor’s granddaughters quest to find him the perfect birthday gift! And more!

First Thought:

After reading the last volume in this series I immediately rushed to purchase this one. I really wanted to find out who the new Thor is and if my suspicions are true! And after the fantastic job that was the previous volume, I’m more than excited to continue reading.

Overall Thoughts and Opinions:

This one wasn’t quite what I was expecting. The main story is just three action packed issues, while the rest appear to be three short stories and a release of an issue from the 70s. Honestly, I’m not quite sure how to rate this one so bear with me on this review!

I really enjoyed the main story; there was a lot of action, plot advancements, and character development. In just three issues you get a really cool action-packed fight scene with the Destroyer. Normally I hate it when an action sequence is spread out too long, it reminds me of Dragon Ball Z and similar works with impossibly long battles that drag on forever. However, this one didn’t bug me because it was a really interesting battle. You get to see more of Thor’s personality as she fights the Destroyer, you see her get her lights knocked out and dragged through the dirt. You get to see what drives her to be Thor, why she won’t just give up. And in this fight you get to see other characters come into play as they help her defeat the Destroyer. It’s not because she’s a woman that they help her, but they want to see just what this new Thor is made of and to figure out just what kind of hero she’ll be. Aside from the main fight, we also get to see more of what the future story will hold as Malekith continues with his deadly plan!

The short stories from Thor Annual #1 were mostly interesting. The King Thor story was a bit depressing for me because it’s set in a really grim time in the future and there seems to be very little hope. The story is also a bit strange because it doesn’t give any hints as to what happened to make the future thus and the characters are rather lack lustered. The art for that story is really dark and a bit bland, fitting the mood of the tale, I guess. I really enjoyed the short story of the new Thor and the Warriors Three. It’s a quick read full of shenanigans, bonding, and discovery. The last in the Annual is just a simple comedic story of Thor’s legendary drinking skill. It’s set before Thor is a great, mighty hero and he has to prove his worth to Mjolnir, so he does various tasks to prove he is worthy. This short story involved a drinking contest with the devil and high-jinx ensues. It’s a cute little story, though the art while comedic was a little off putting. Overall, the King Thor story was my least favorite of the three while new Thor had the best story and art.

The last story in this volume is a What If from 1977, where the Watcher shows readers what the world would be like if {blank} happened. In issue 10, it’s what if Jane Foster found the hammer and became Thordis. It’s a weird story and I was a bit lost at times because I’m not very familiar with the early history of Thor. I also found some of the dialogue to be boring or just plain repetitive as the characters sometimes spoke a loud what they were doing as it happened. The art was fine, and I really enjoyed the coloring. Overall, it was alright and I understand why they included it in this volume but you can totally skip it if you don’t have a strong interest to read a ‘what if ’story.

Ratings:

Note: Since this volume includes work outside of the actually series I’m only rating issues 6-8, while making mentions of the extra content. This time the extra content will hold no sway over the ratings.

Art: 5

Nothing has really changed, I really love the art work in this story! Those an attention to detail that doesn’t draw you away from the story and is affected by the practicality of it in each scene. For instance, like in real life the further you are from the subject the less detailed it is. Another example is the added details that lend to the magical quality of a particular scene over another. Though I wish there was a little less detail in some of the gorier scenes. There were times when I shock in disgust and had to skim over the panel because it was too much. The coloring was also really nice and well balanced. The brightness of the colors really lent to the mood of the scenes, or helped in contrast to bring attention to certain details. It’s nice to see foreshadowing being displayed through shadow and color. I think my favorite part of the art in this volume are the facial expressions. They were so expressive and conveyed so much detail that didn’t need dialogue, and that’s fantastic in my books! Also, some Odinson’s expressions were just priceless.

Story: 5

I feel like the story in this volume is much improved than the last. Normally I don’t like battles that last more than one issue, but I feel like this one was done quite well. There’s a lot of character development in the fight scene and it opens up possible side adventures with other characters. The battle really does a lot to flesh out Thor and it also helps draw a line with some of the other characters in this story, especially where they stand on larger issues. There are a few places in the story that needed a bit more background and some of them note previous Thor issues (that I don’t have access to), but most don’t. So if you’re up to date with everything then you’ll be fine, if you’re just starting to read Thor after the switch you might get a little lost. Finally, the big question is answered as Thor’s identity is revealed at the end, but it may not be who you think it is. I’m actually quite happy with the choice and it’s extremely plausible, giving more depth and humility to the character of Thor.

Overall: 4.5

This volume really helps to set up the tone for the rest of the story, when or wherever they decide to continue it. The artwork is fantastic, the character development is wonderful, and for once I really enjoyed a stretched out fight scene. The one weakness to this volume are the extra stories. While some of them are really good, they may throw a lot of people off or confuse some readers. Honestly, I only enjoyed two of the four and only one of them I loved all around. I still high recommend this volume of Thor, but maybe skim the Annual and the What if.

Details:

Title: Thor: Who Holds the Hammer?

Volume: 2

Issue(s): 6-8, Thor Annual #1, What if? (1977) #10

Publisher: Marvel

Creator(s): Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, and Jack Kirby

Writer(s): Jason Aaron

Illustrator: Russell Dauterman

Colors: Matthew Wilson

Letters: VC’s Joe Sabino

Released Date: July 21st, 2015

Pages: 136

Genre(s): Super hero, Fantasy, Action

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s