Comic Review: Jim Henson’s The Storyteller: Fairies (1/4)

Synopsis:

Matt Smith (Lake of Fire, Barbarian Lord) reimagines the ‘The Elf Queen and the Shepherd,’ a tale of elven fairies in Iceland. When a Fairy Princess is cursed to the human realm and cursed to bring death with her, Grettir the Strong must discover the source of the trouble and break her curse.

What I First Thought:

So I wasn’t the one to pick this comic out. Actually, my sweet and loving boyfriend bought it for me when he went to the comic book store. I couldn’t go because I wasn’t feeling up to it, so he surprised me by bringing this one home with him. He said that he thought that I might like it and that I should give it a try, so I did!

Ratings:

Art: 5/5

I really enjoyed the art for this issue because it really went well with the story and the region it hails from. The coloring in this story is what I think I liked the best. The shades and hues matched the various moods of the story was it was told. The human lands where a bit dull and muted for the most part, while the faerie lands had more variety of color and richness. Basically, the coloring really helped to create the mood, feel, and magic for the story as it was told.

Story: 5/5

For a story being told in a single issue, I feel like Matt Smith did a wonderful job of shaping his characters in so few pages. Each character was unique in design and personality, so even if you had a hard time with the names you wouldn’t mix them up anyways! The narration was fantastic; it had a personality that really helped with getting acquainted with the storyteller without taking away from the tale. The ending is a little open, but not as much as other stories that I’ve read. By the end, you know how each of the characters fair without feeling cheated, at least I didn’t.

Overall: 5

If you’re a fan of retold stories from around the world you might really enjoy this one, especially if you have a love of faeries! I can’t wait to see what other stories will be told in the coming issues.

Details:

Title: Jim Henson’s The Storyteller: Fairies

Issue: 1

Publisher: Archaia

Creator: Jim Henson

Writer: Matt Smith

Illustrator: Matt Smith

Colors: Dan Jackson

Letters: Jim Campbell

Released Date: December 20th, 2017

Pages: 28

Genre: Fantasy, Fairytale retelling

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Comic Review: Sword of Ages (1/5)

Synopsis:

A young woman will become the first wielder of the most famous sacred weapon of all time to champion for her world’s survival, inspiring a legion of heroes to join her struggle against a merciless alien force. The line between science fiction and magic might get fuzzy, but the line between heroes and villains will be drawn in blood.

What I First Thought:

I picked this one up from my local comic book store on a whim. By the cover alone, it looked like it would be some sort of sci-fi fantasy set on a desolate planet. I don’t see very many sci-fi fantasies that actually interest me anymore, but after skimming through the pages and seeing all sorts of Arthurian references pop up I decided to give it a go.

Ratings:

Art: 5/5

I won’t spend long on the art, but Sword of Ages was a very nice comic to look at. The artist has a very clean drawing style that is very detailed without going over the top with the line work. The colors are very bright, fitting in with the lighting of the environment of the story very well. There also seems to be a realistic variety of color that help to make certain characters pop without making them look out of place. And speaking of characters, I really enjoyed the character designs for this story. The heroine isn’t overly pretty, she’s gruff and well-built based on how she lived, and the male characters aren’t over the top either. But each character is unique enough to be distinguished from any other.

Story: 4/5

I felt that the beginning of the story was a little rough because it just throws the reader in with no information and then time speeds up. The time skip felt a little weird to me, mostly because it left a lot of questions that the story may never have time to answer. It also took away from some of the emotional impact in one scene before the journey actually begins, mostly because there wasn’t enough time to really show some of the relationships between the characters. There were times when it got a little confusing as to who spoke, but by the end of the page it would clear itself up.

Overall: 4

So far I’m intrigued by this story and want to see how it will end. At first appearance it looks like a combination of magic, aliens, Mad Max, and Planet of the Apes, especially with rogue biker looking Merlin and Ape slavers! Not sure how much of the Arthurian legends the author will use in this story, but I’m curious to see what they’ll do with it.

Details:

Title: Sword of Ages

Issue: 1

Publisher: IDW

Creator: Gabriel Rodrguez

Writer: Gabriel Rodrguez

Illustrator: Gabriel Rodrguez

Colors: Lovern Kindzierski

Letters: Robbie Robbins

Released Date: November 29th, 2017

Pages: 32

Genre: Science Fiction, Fantasy, Action/Adventure

Comic Review: Moonstruck (1.1)

Synopsis:

A NEW ONGOING SERIES from Lumberjanes creator GRACE ELLIS and talented newcomer SHAE BEAGLE that tells a story of monsters, romance, and magical hijinks! The first arc also includes an additional short story with artist KATE LETH!

Fantasy creatures are living typical, unremarkable lives alongside humans, and barista Julie strives to be the most unremarkable of all. Normal job, normal almost-girlfriend, normal…werewolf transformations that happen when she gets upset? Yikes!

But all bets are off when she and her centaur best friend Chet find themselves in the middle of a magical conspiracy. Will Julie and Chet be able to save their friends? Is Julie’s dogged determination to be normal a lost cause? Who’s going to watch the coffee shop while our heroes are out saving the world?? These questions and more will be answered in MOONSTRUCK!

What I First Thought:

I picked this issue up on a whim. Some of the stuff that I’ve been reading has been either a little lack-luster or super intense, and this story looked like it would be more laid back than the others. I also love reading stories that use mythological creatures in a more everyday setting, it really adds a special kinda life to the story.

Ratings:

Art: 5/5

The art is very soft, from the colors to the line work, and I love it! I’ve noticed that a lot of comics seem to have very hard defining colors, a lot of them make for beautiful scenes but they seem to always want to POP! out of the page. For this series, I really doubt that art style would fit the overall tone so I’m really happy that the overall look of the panels are very soft, but still bright and eye-catching. I also love the character designs; they’re each so unique in style and shape. Not only do we have all sorts of fantastical creatures but also varying body types for the more human looking characters and realistic models for the more supernatural-looking characters! It’s weird to fixate on body types, but I like to read stories sometimes that can show me all kinds of different people and make them all seem normal—even though in this case none of the characters are what we would consider ‘normal’.

Story: 5/5

Like most first issues, this one has the main focus on setting up the characters and the world they live in. So this issue is full of cute, or not so cute, moments between the characters that give you a quick summation of the characters. Each character appears to be different, and not just in style but in personality as well.

Overall: 5

I’m really excited that I bought the next issue when I picked up this one, because I can’t wait to see where this story goes. If you want more diverse characters and love, then look no further because you’ll find it here! There is diversity in body type (not just oooo! he has hooves or he’s part bull), race, and sexual orientation. So far there is a confirmed lesbian relationship, for those of you interested in some cute, awkward F/F love that isn’t just a side note but the main attraction!

 

Details:

Title: Moonstruck

Issue: 1

Publisher:

Writer: Grace Ellis

Illustrator: Shae Beagle

Colors: Caitlin Quirk/Shae Beagle

Letters: Clayton Cowles

Released Date: July 19th, 2017

Pages: 31

Genre: Urban Fantasy, Romance, LGBT+

Graphic Novel Review: Princeless – Raven: The Pirate Princess (vol.1)

Synopsis:

SET SAIL FOR REVENGE!

Fresh off her adventures in the pages of Princeless, Raven is ready to set out on her quest for revenge against her brothers. They’ve stolen everything that should be hers and now she’s going to get it back. But first, she needs a crew. Share the laughs, action, and adventure as Raven assembles the fearless crew of awesome ladies who will help her get her revenge.

First Thought:

The other week was the biggest sale of the year at our local comic book store, so along with grabbing our comics I decided to pick up a trade too. I had seen the Princeless series before but never from the beginning, and I’m quite lazy about tracking down trades. But I saw this one in the story and noticed that it was a first volume, so I thought that this was as good as anywhere too start. I like pirates and I like girl empowering comics, so what’s there to lose?

Overall Thoughts and Opinions:

I wasn’t expecting much from this volume, I try going into something new with little expectations, but I still felt disappointed by Raven the Pirate Princess. They advertised that this was going to be a funny action-packed adventure, but all the jokes fell flat or weren’t funny to begin with and the action jut ended up being little blips on the radar.

The characters felt artificial, like the author had a check list on their desk as they wrote the story. “Big” butch girl who dresses like a man, check. Punk chick with a face full of metal and a half shaved head, check. Father who is trying to raise his daughter right but in all the wrong ways and throws in weird sexist remarks that don’t fit his overall character, check. Young black girl how has to be stubborn and doesn’t care for before mentioned father, check. Tough Asian girl that has to do everything for herself, check. A bunch of women who generally hate men, check. A bunch of men that have no respect for women and don’t view them as equals, check. Check. Oh bloody check! Like it’s fine to have those characters, but I’ve that list or something similar in a lot of other stories at the moment and it gets so boring to read. The characters in Raven the Pirate Princess barely have personalities outside of their labels. I understand that this is just the first volume, but only one of those characters really grabbed me and the others just felt like old lukewarm water. The majority of the characters didn’t make me feel like I wanted to continue reading about their stories.

There actually wasn’t much in this volume that made me want to continue reading. The premise sounded pretty promising but nothing really happened in this volume. The most action is in the first chapter, the second chapter has an unnecessary bar fight, and the last chapter has a tense scene that gets solved with a stupid plan that just showed that all men are stupid. Really that was just the whole idea of this story, that men are all sexist and racist and total screw-ups and only women can do things right, which as a woman I found to be terribly boring and toxic to read. All my life the majority of the people who told me that I wasn’t pretty enough, that I was fat or needed to lose weight, or that I wasn’t smart enough to go into math and science were women. My father has always supported me and my education and has cheered me on from the beginning, making sure that I got my hands on anything that could help me learn more. My partner has gotten into arguments with women who have told me that I wasn’t good enough, he even defends me against myself from the internalized abuse that I learned from an early age. So I get defensive when books, comic, and other media portray all men to be careless, sexist, abusive jerks that can’t get anything right when it’s been older women and girls my own age who have been all those things to me. I think it’s great to get more stories out there about take charge women in generally male dominated roles, or stories in general that empower women. I draw the line when they start bashing men and create male characters from overblown stereotypes. It would’ve been fine if they had a few male characters like that, but almost every male character that was given dialogue was some sort of offensive caricature, and the few who weren’t still had some out of place dialogue that was sexist in some way. The characters they were portraying were just strawmen, and I have a hard time believing that out of an entire town there is only one good male character—come on! End Rant.

While reading this I also wasn’t sure who their audience was. Sure there’s media out there that can be enjoyed by all age groups, but that’s because it contains content that entertains all ages. This story is marketed to 9 year olds and up. Sure, what 9 year old wouldn’t like to read about an all-girl pirate crew? However, almost all of the “bold” statements made in this volume would go right over a kid’s head or they would misinterpret the messages. Yes, there are things like positive body image and it’s okay to be into classically ‘geeky/nerdy’ things, but all the heavy handed comments are things older people will understand and this volume is soaked in them. There’s no even balance, and there’s not even enough action to hold a lot of kids’ interests—I mean I had a hard time staying motivated till the end and it’s only three chapters.

Last thing, this story is marketed as a fantasy but I feel like it just barely made it into this category because it’s lower than the average low fantasy story. For instance, all the characters speak as if they belonged to our present day and about current ‘issues’. Now, in other fantasies these issues would be changed in a way to fit the setting so that they can be seen as similar to us but still not a direct parallel. In Raven the Pirate Princess, they don’t even bother making anything different in the slightest bit. Even some of the clothes and mannerisms are things we’d see in our everyday lives, like a few of the characters have distinctly plastic looking glasses that you can get from Walmart and one character looks exactly like a mother that would ask for a manager. I know that’s very nitpicky, but it’s also very distracting and makes the story and art look sloppy. And the only fantasy things mentioned in the story are a goofy dragon that we never meet and a character that claims to be half-elf, “I got all the good parts—height, speed, the looks—just without the pointy ears” *cough*Mary-Sue*cough-cough*. And overall the world building is just lazy. The story takes a lot of common day things for us, like board games, third-wave feminism, LARP, and D&D, and place it in a non-descript setting with a few kings somewhere that all lock their daughters in towers to be saved. Maybe it’s because I never found and read the first series, but the world in this story is lazily crafted and full of cardboard cut-outs.

Ratings:

Art: 3

The art was okay. It wasn’t the best but it was far from the worst. The characters and detailing are very simplistic in design, though at times there were some issues with continuity. I didn’t like some of the character designs because they looked too modern or really out of place for no reason. The detailing is very simple, showing only the idea of patterns and the like. Sometimes I felt like the settings were too bland and unimpressive, but that might just be for my taste. The coloring was okay, nothing gorgeous. A lot of the panels have a very red pallet, which didn’t always make sense because it didn’t match with the lighting and I felt like it washed out some of the characters at times. There are a few places were the coloring gets really sloppy with noticeable areas with color outside of the lines or distinct white areas that don’t belong. I will say that each character design is very unique, too bad they just couldn’t translate that into their personalities.

Story: 2

I did not care for this storyline and I have no real interest to read further. The premise of the story sounded promising, but after all the heavy-handed comments and the blatant man bashing I just can’t. I felt disgusted by a lot of the comments that were made, by both the male and female characters, but mostly I hated how the female characters acted. The dialogue was terrible; there were times that the characters didn’t need to speak and other times when it just sounded too campy and fake. There was one character that I liked above all the others, but I doubt she’ll get much panel time in this story. The humor fell flat for me, I don’t even think that I laughed once, and the action was just boring and full of unnecessary dialogue.

Overall: 2

I’d recommend this story to anyone who likes the more recent waves of feminism or who want a story that has a sprinkling of fantasy. I would also recommend this to anyone who wants a diverse cast, the diversity here is pretty good though completely one-sided. Some kids may enjoy Raven the Pirate Princess, but I think the bigger fan base will be of the high school-college ages. If you’re a fan of fantasy don’t pick this up, you’ll be disappointed. As for me, if I find the next volume at a tremendous discounted price I might pick it up, otherwise this wasn’t worth my money.

Details:

Title: Princeless-Raven: The Pirate Princess

Volume: 1- Captain Raven and the All-Girl Pirate Crew

Issue(s): 1-3

Publisher: Action Lab Entertainment

Writer(s): Jeremy Whitley

Illustrator: Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt

Colors Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt

Letters: Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt

Released Date: January 26th, 2016

Pages: 128

Genre(s): Young Adult, Fantasy (loosely), Comedy, Action/Adventure

 

Graphic Novel Review: Joyride (vol.1)

Synopsis:

Earth sucks. Steal a spaceship.

Earth sucks. The stars have been blocked out for so long that people have forgotten there was anything else besides the World Government Alliance watching over them. Uma Akkolyte is a girl who shoots first, leaps before she looks, and is desperate for any means to leave her planet behind. And so she does. When Uma jacks an alien spaceship and punches through the stratosphere she sets forth on an adventure with an unlikely crew who are totally not ready for all the good, bad, and weird the universe will throw at them.

From writers Jackson Lanzing and Collin Kelly (Batman and Robin Eternal, Grayson) and artist Marcus To (Nightwing, New Avengers), Joyride is a rebellious love letter to the sci-fi genre, exploring what happens when nothing stands between a group of teens and their freedom amongst the stars.

First Thought:

I was at a comic book store last weekend killing some time when I found Joyride. It looked like a fun little space adventure story and I wanted a little change in pace.

Overall Thoughts and Opinions:

The art is fantastic…the story not so much.

I had no expectations going into this comic but I still felt disappointed. First off, I hate it when people throw around words/names like “Nazis”, “Hitler”, and “fascist” for no real reason. I hate it; I absolutely hate it with a burning passion because it desensitizes people to the meaning of those words and it weakens those words altogether. It’s fine if someone deserves those insults thrown at them, but in the case of Joyride they’re just thrown around like cheap liquor after payday−and it was beyond annoying, to the point of being aggravating. I don’t mean to preach and I understand the real significance to those words. I hear them used every day to the point where my brain just automatically tunes them out, which is devastating, and that’s why it aggravated me that they were used so meaninglessly in this volume. This is supposed to be in our future, why are our successors still using those terms?

In fact, why does Earth suck so much? The writers barely get into why the characters want to leave. Well Earth sucks and you can’t see the stars…aaannnd? Nothing, that’s it. The main character, Uma, keeps calling Earth fascist, but there aren’t any clear examples to back her up on that. There’s hardly any background at all in this volume, which can make readers more curious or it can make them more lost than they already are. There’s not even an outline of the current setup of Earth, there’s nothing on any governments or status, just veiled terms they throw around without explaining. There’s one incident that gets barely mentioned, but it’s so vague as to what happens that I couldn’t feel the same level of emotion as the other characters, which really takes you out of a story! I don’t want entire pages full of text boxes full of backstory and history, but seriously give me some reason to believe why Earth sucks so much other than being xenophobic, but for aliens.

Usually, stories have some sort of plot driving them or each issue is a story within itself with a start and a finish. Joyride has neither a coherent driving plotline, other than Uma wants to be anywhere but Earth, and each chapter isn’t a story within itself. The only plotline is that Uma wants to explore the galaxy while some of her companions are being chased by another character to be brought back to Earth. Why? No one knows! Why does Uma want to travel through space? Because Earth sucks. Does she have a plan/destination in mind? No. Is she smart about her space travelling? No, actually she has no care for herself or her companions. Is there anything that is driving her other than immature curiosity? Nope, she just wants to see everything just because. There’s no rhyme or reason, just wild adrenaline filled curiosity fit for a teenager but it gets old after a while.

Speaking of Uma, I actually really hate her character. At first I thought she was a pretty cool rebel girl, but as the story went that’s as far as she went. She’s a rebel with no cause, no rally cry. She’s stupidly dangerous and has little to no concern for her friends. She’s apparently smart enough to make contact with aliens, even though Earth made it impossible, and has a lot of “street smart” dealing with cops all her life yet she can’t keep herself out of trouble. She’s reckless, explosive, and self-centered and currently has no redeeming qualities to me. For how much I dislike her character, I love the others in Joyride. I think Dewydd is my favorite because he feels the most natural and realistic to me. His reason for leaving was because he was done heling Luna kill people and he just wanted to be free, and because he might have a huge crush on Uma (poor guy). Catrin is alright, though her motivations are unclear and they seemed to change at the drop of a hat. All the supporting characters are really cool and interesting, and honestly I wish I got more of them or at least Dewydd than I did of Uma.

Ratings:

Art: 5

I really enjoyed the artwork in Joyride! The character and alien designs were amazing and well balanced between simple and intricate. I’m a stickler for clothing, oddly enough, and the detailing on the clothes was just perfect. There were enough creases and folds to give suggestions of movement or stretching without looking over done and drawing the eye away from the rest of the panel. The coloring was fantastic and possibly my favorite part of the comic. Kniivila did a wonderful job using both light and dark colors to bring life and emotion to the pages. I loved it when she used both lights and darks together, it really added to the panels, making them more serious and dramatic. Overall, fantastic art and coloring that made this comic very pleasing to look at−even if the story was less than stellar.

Story: 2

I felt like the story crafting in this volume was just lazy. The writers just throw their readers into this futuristic story, saying it’s terrible without giving real reason for it except that our main characters say so. I hate stories that don’t spend the time making readers believe, or at least understand, what the main characters do. Most of the characters have no clear motivations for their actions. Honestly, they felt like teenagers who were written by writers who can’t remember what it was like to be a young adult, let alone a teenager! The space adventuring seemed cool enough. I always love weird space exploring, but it felt too random like it was space weirdness for the sake of space weirdness. I thought this story might have been a collection of isolated space adventures, but instead it read like it should’ve had an overarching plot, except it’s so overarching that it got lost in space before it could come back down. And don’t get me start on the science. This is not a science fiction, it’s a space opera because the laws of science went right out the airlock before the first chapter even ended. You cannot, I repeat, cannot survive in space without oxygen for longer than a handful of seconds before dying. You can definitely not speak in open space without an oxygen mask, it’s impossible even if you wouldn’t die from trying!

Overall: 3.5

Even though this story was extremely flawed, I think I’m still going to give the next chapter a try to see if there’s any sort of character growth and to see where the characters I do like go. I really hope that the writing improves, but I really doubt it. This isn’t a sci-fi adventure that I’d recommend to too many people, especially those who really like science fiction, though I would recommend this to those who like crazy space operas.

Details:

Title: Joyride

Volume: 1

Issue(s): 1-4

Publisher: BOOM! Studios

Creator(s): Marcus To, Jackson Lanzing & Collin Kelly

Writer(s): Jackson Lanzing & Collin Kelly

Illustrator: Marcus To

Colors: Irma Kniivila

Letters: Jim Campbell

Released Date: September 27th, 2016

Pages: 112

Genre(s): Space Opera, Young Adult, Action/Adventure

Graphic Novel Review: Thor vol.2 Who Holds the Hammer?

Synopsis:

The Odinson pops the question: Who is the new Thor?

The Odinson wants Mjolnir back−and that means uncovering the identity of the new heroine holding the hammer! As he narrows down the list of suspects, tensions continue to flare between the All-Mother and All-Father. As Malekith the Dark Elf forges his most dangerous pact yet, the new Thor prepares to face her greatest challenge: the unstoppable machine of death and destruction that is…the Destroyer! While the battle for Mjolnir rages on an unexpected character makes a shocking return−and the new Thor’s identity is revealed at last! Plus: Young Thor enters a drinking competition! The new Thor takes on a surprising foe! In the future, King Thor’s granddaughters quest to find him the perfect birthday gift! And more!

First Thought:

After reading the last volume in this series I immediately rushed to purchase this one. I really wanted to find out who the new Thor is and if my suspicions are true! And after the fantastic job that was the previous volume, I’m more than excited to continue reading.

Overall Thoughts and Opinions:

This one wasn’t quite what I was expecting. The main story is just three action packed issues, while the rest appear to be three short stories and a release of an issue from the 70s. Honestly, I’m not quite sure how to rate this one so bear with me on this review!

I really enjoyed the main story; there was a lot of action, plot advancements, and character development. In just three issues you get a really cool action-packed fight scene with the Destroyer. Normally I hate it when an action sequence is spread out too long, it reminds me of Dragon Ball Z and similar works with impossibly long battles that drag on forever. However, this one didn’t bug me because it was a really interesting battle. You get to see more of Thor’s personality as she fights the Destroyer, you see her get her lights knocked out and dragged through the dirt. You get to see what drives her to be Thor, why she won’t just give up. And in this fight you get to see other characters come into play as they help her defeat the Destroyer. It’s not because she’s a woman that they help her, but they want to see just what this new Thor is made of and to figure out just what kind of hero she’ll be. Aside from the main fight, we also get to see more of what the future story will hold as Malekith continues with his deadly plan!

The short stories from Thor Annual #1 were mostly interesting. The King Thor story was a bit depressing for me because it’s set in a really grim time in the future and there seems to be very little hope. The story is also a bit strange because it doesn’t give any hints as to what happened to make the future thus and the characters are rather lack lustered. The art for that story is really dark and a bit bland, fitting the mood of the tale, I guess. I really enjoyed the short story of the new Thor and the Warriors Three. It’s a quick read full of shenanigans, bonding, and discovery. The last in the Annual is just a simple comedic story of Thor’s legendary drinking skill. It’s set before Thor is a great, mighty hero and he has to prove his worth to Mjolnir, so he does various tasks to prove he is worthy. This short story involved a drinking contest with the devil and high-jinx ensues. It’s a cute little story, though the art while comedic was a little off putting. Overall, the King Thor story was my least favorite of the three while new Thor had the best story and art.

The last story in this volume is a What If from 1977, where the Watcher shows readers what the world would be like if {blank} happened. In issue 10, it’s what if Jane Foster found the hammer and became Thordis. It’s a weird story and I was a bit lost at times because I’m not very familiar with the early history of Thor. I also found some of the dialogue to be boring or just plain repetitive as the characters sometimes spoke a loud what they were doing as it happened. The art was fine, and I really enjoyed the coloring. Overall, it was alright and I understand why they included it in this volume but you can totally skip it if you don’t have a strong interest to read a ‘what if ’story.

Ratings:

Note: Since this volume includes work outside of the actually series I’m only rating issues 6-8, while making mentions of the extra content. This time the extra content will hold no sway over the ratings.

Art: 5

Nothing has really changed, I really love the art work in this story! Those an attention to detail that doesn’t draw you away from the story and is affected by the practicality of it in each scene. For instance, like in real life the further you are from the subject the less detailed it is. Another example is the added details that lend to the magical quality of a particular scene over another. Though I wish there was a little less detail in some of the gorier scenes. There were times when I shock in disgust and had to skim over the panel because it was too much. The coloring was also really nice and well balanced. The brightness of the colors really lent to the mood of the scenes, or helped in contrast to bring attention to certain details. It’s nice to see foreshadowing being displayed through shadow and color. I think my favorite part of the art in this volume are the facial expressions. They were so expressive and conveyed so much detail that didn’t need dialogue, and that’s fantastic in my books! Also, some Odinson’s expressions were just priceless.

Story: 5

I feel like the story in this volume is much improved than the last. Normally I don’t like battles that last more than one issue, but I feel like this one was done quite well. There’s a lot of character development in the fight scene and it opens up possible side adventures with other characters. The battle really does a lot to flesh out Thor and it also helps draw a line with some of the other characters in this story, especially where they stand on larger issues. There are a few places in the story that needed a bit more background and some of them note previous Thor issues (that I don’t have access to), but most don’t. So if you’re up to date with everything then you’ll be fine, if you’re just starting to read Thor after the switch you might get a little lost. Finally, the big question is answered as Thor’s identity is revealed at the end, but it may not be who you think it is. I’m actually quite happy with the choice and it’s extremely plausible, giving more depth and humility to the character of Thor.

Overall: 4.5

This volume really helps to set up the tone for the rest of the story, when or wherever they decide to continue it. The artwork is fantastic, the character development is wonderful, and for once I really enjoyed a stretched out fight scene. The one weakness to this volume are the extra stories. While some of them are really good, they may throw a lot of people off or confuse some readers. Honestly, I only enjoyed two of the four and only one of them I loved all around. I still high recommend this volume of Thor, but maybe skim the Annual and the What if.

Details:

Title: Thor: Who Holds the Hammer?

Volume: 2

Issue(s): 6-8, Thor Annual #1, What if? (1977) #10

Publisher: Marvel

Creator(s): Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, and Jack Kirby

Writer(s): Jason Aaron

Illustrator: Russell Dauterman

Colors: Matthew Wilson

Letters: VC’s Joe Sabino

Released Date: July 21st, 2015

Pages: 136

Genre(s): Super hero, Fantasy, Action

 

Graphic Novel Review: Monstress (volume 1)

Synopsis:

Set in an alternate world of art deco beauty and steampunk horror, MONSTRESS tells the epic story of Maika Halfwolf, a teenage survivor of a cataclysmic war between humans and heir hated enemies, the Arcanics. In the face of oppression and terrible danger, Maika is both hunter and hunted, searching for answers about her mysterious past as those who seek to use her remain just one step behind…and all the while, the monster within begins to awaken…

First Thought:

I first found this volume when I started getting into comics, and it was actually one of the first that I picked and bought on my own. Before then, I just read whatever my boyfriend and his family suggested. I think what drew me the most to Montress was the art; it was vastly different than the other things I had been reading at the time and I wanted to know the story that went with it.

Overall Opinions:

I absolutely loved Monstress! It was beautiful, magical, and slightly terrifying. There’s so much I can say and I’m not quite sure where to begin! Maybe I’ll start with the few things I liked the least about the story? Yea, that sounds good enough.

I’ve never been much for gore, at times it necessary in a story, but I prefer to hear it and the reactions of others and allow my own mind to come up with the image. It’s part of the reason I stay away from most horror films because they seem to use gore for the sake of gore, not to add any real favoring to the story. Anyways, while this story doesn’t quite use gore for the sake of gore, there’s still a lot of it. In fact, I believe it’s a little muted compared to some of the other comics I’ve read, which have made my stomach sour at the detailing.

I do really enjoy fantasies, but my least favorite thing about them is all the backstory related to the tale. Don’t get me wrong, I love backstory as much as the next person, but at the beginning of a fantasy a lot of the needed information is missing because it’s nestled in the backstory that won’t be revealed until later. Fortunately for this story, most of the major plot points don’t reference or involve past events from the backstory. Sure, there’s a ton of mystery behind Maika that might make parts of the story make a little bit more sense, but she’s a mystery to herself so that’s okay. It’s not like the backstory isn’t being revealed. In fact, it’s slowly coming together at breaks in the story in an interesting way. Instead of relying on awkward dialogue between main characters to talk about past events, you read the information from another character separate from the story as they teach their class about history. Some people might find that annoying and will skip over it, since it has no effect on the immediate story, but I found those segments clever and fascinating. The one bit of backstory that really irked me though was this battle that greatly affected the world. So many characters make reference to it, but not all their information is the same and anything said is only in bits and pieces. Even towards the end the battle is assumed to begin to be explained, but only in mixed up fragments. I get it’s part of the story to figure out what happened at that battle, and normally it wouldn’t frustrate me so, but it’s referenced so much that while I know it should be important, the magnitude is lost on me.

Other than those two things, the gore and constipated backstory, the rest of the story is fantastic! The characters are fantastic, even the villains are interesting follow. Maika is a strong female lead that starts her monumental journey not because someone told her she was destined for greatness, that she’ll save the world, etc. but because she wants to find herself and let the world be damned! She’s so hard, but not quite in a bitchy sort of way, she’s a survivor that still has some softness to her that rarely shows. Then there’s Kippa who is probably my favorite because she plays the important roles of grounding Maika and comic relief. She’s a complicated character in her own right and I can’t wait to see how she develops!

The world is absolutely breathtaking, it’s so complicated and intricate, like something from the mind of Guillermo del Toro but with an art deco Asian twist. Dead gods, humanoid-animal ancient beings, half-breeds, witches, talking cats, and demons there’s so much this fantasy world has to offer. There’s a mixture of old and new that’s so fascinating. Great steampunk themed labs and facilities built on ancient ruins. Swords and steampunk inspired muskets and pistols. Winged warriors and airships. Everything just clashes in a beautiful chaotic masterpiece!

Ratings:

Art: 5

The art is phenomenal, a combination of simple and intricate details that added depth to this fantasy world. A lot of the more detailed work went into the designs in the backgrounds, clothing, and weaponry, but only when needed. The extremely comprehensive designs on the clothing allowed more important characters to stand out from others, or show their power (physically, monetarily, magically, etc.). But most of the characters are rather basic in design, excluding their clothing and coloring. Any character that had a lot of detailing, specifically in the face, where to reveal their harsh ugly personality or utter terror in death. The detailing in the background depended on the importance or power of the scenery as well, adding unspoken information to the story for readers to choose to glean. The coloring in the story is wonderful as well, giving it an old feel like someone retelling an old tale. The colors match the mood of the story well, bright when calm or happy, dark when terrifying, and muted when recalling. Overall, the art is darker than I normally like, but it matches with the story so well that I wouldn’t want it any other way!

Story: 4

For the most part, I really enjoyed the story and had a time putting it down. It’s a beautifully written fantasy with a concept I haven’t read in a long time, which was refreshing. The characters are different than I expected, but extremely enjoyable to read about. The backstory is still a little lacking, making some scenes a little hard to follow due to the information gaps, but that’ll clear up with each installment. Though I feel like some of the bigger wholes from the backstory weakened the magnitude of parts of the story. The story is full of action and intrigue, pulling at readers’ curiosity as the mysteries start to unfold! The horror isn’t too much, at least not yet, and it chilled me in a delightful sort of way. The gore wasn’t too terrible, but I wouldn’t suggest showing it to children. The dialogue is rather witty, and it fits each character well, allowing their personalities to show through.

Overall: 4.5

Altogether, this was a fantastic first installment to what I believe will be a thrilling adventure! I would recommend it to any horror or fantasy fan, or anyone who loves the work of Neil Gaiman or Guillermo del Toro. I wouldn’t recommend this to any young readers for it contains beheading, gore, mutilation, and explicate death scenes. If any of the before listed things frighten or disturb you please don’t read Monstress or do so at your own risk.

Details:

Title:  Monstress: Awakening

Volume: 1

Issue(s): 1-6

Publisher: Image Comics

Writer(s): Majorie Liu

Illustrator: Sana Takeda

Colors: Rus Wooton

Letters: Rus Wooton

Released Date: July 19th 2016

Pages: 202

Genre(s): Young Adult, Fantasy, Horror, Steampunk