Manga Review: The Seven Deadly Sins (vol.8)

 

Synopsis:

GIANT STEPS

The seal is broken, and Gowther, the Sin of Lust, is revealed! The ruthless, elite Holy Knights known as the Roars of Dawn have tracked down the mysterious Armor Giant. They seem to have it cornered, but it hides a hair-raising secret! When they learn the truth, the Sins are befuddled, and the princess doubles her resolve! What decision has Meliodas made about the memories entrusted to him? When the countdown to the destruction of their world begins, the Sins rush back to the kingdom. The fuse is lit on the decisive battle!

Overall Thoughts/Opinions:

4/5

This volume contains the conclusion of Gowthar’s first appearance and the start of the final stretch of the first arc. Secrets and dastardly plans are revealed in between intense action sequences. Buckle up boys and girls, cuz this roller coaster is speeding up and won’t stop until the end!

In the beginning, we get to see into some of Meliodas’s past and more into his character. Then during the last bit of Gowthar’s appearance there’s a nice moment between Meliodas and Elizabeth. Honestly, I wish that there were more of these moments and a little less action, but alas I don’t think that’ll really happen. At the end of the battle with the Armor Giant we see some into Gowthar’s personality. It seems like his character is going to be a rocky one and that there will be tons of room for growth. After a nice little drunk bonding session we immediately get thrown into the next round of fights that will eventually lead to the final battle of this arc. Everyone converges on the capital and bodies begin to fly, and at the very end we get introduced to King Arthur and his mysterious companion. At the very end is a nice little bonus short story centered around Gowthar, which adds a little fluff to his character and serves as a nice little break before punches really start swinging. If you haven’t picked this volume up yet then get this one and the next two, because this final sequences of battles will span the next few volumes and I’m sure will be super intense!

Details:

Title: The Seven Deadly Sins (Vol. 8)

Chapters: 55-62, plus a bonus story

Written by: Nakaba Suzuki

Artist: Nakaba Suzuki

Translation/Adaptation: Christine Dashiell

Lettering: James Dashiell

Publisher:  Kodansha Comics

Published: May 26th, 2015

Pages: 192

Genre: Manga, Historical-Fantasy, Action/Adventure, Young Adult, Romance

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Book Review: The Language of Thorns

Details:

Title: The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

Author: Leigh Bardugo

Illustrator: Sara Kipin

Publisher: Imprint

Release Date: September 26th, 2017

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, Short Stories,

Pages: 281 (hardcover)

Synopsis:

Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid’s voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy’s bidding but only for a terrible price.

Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange—to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

My First Thoughts:

I found this book before going a movie with my boyfriend and his family. We needed to kill some time, because we showed up way too early, so we went into the Barnes & Noble near the theater even though they all knew how dangerous of an idea that is for my wallet. That’s where I found this beautiful book on one of their display stands, and when I flipped through it and saw all the illustrations I knew there was no turning back. I love fairytales and folk lore and when authors try to reimagine them for themselves, even though it’s normally a hit or miss with most stories. I had never read the Grisha novels, though I own the first one, so I was unfamiliar with the author, but I just prayed that her wordsmithing would live up to the beauty of the illustrations.

Overall Thoughts/Opinions:

There’s so much to say for these stories and each one was so different that I feel like I can’t make a lot of generalizing comments about them, so I’ll talk about each one separately.

Ayama and the Thorn Wood

There are not too many stories out there that focuses on the classically ugly or monstrous as main characters. In fact, in young adult fiction especially, the main characters are normally portrayed with unrealistic beauty or overly mentioned mundane features that get too much attention. The first unique thing about this story is not the monster prince that must be reasoned with or killed, but that the one sent to meet him is a young woman who had spent her life on her hands and knees, overlooked, ugly, and not allowed to speak her mind. Ayama is a girl that has all the features that society would deem undesirable, with a voice that made people cringe, and that no one even dare look at, but a sharp mind that could tell when something didn’t seem quite right. She had a self-sacrificing personality because of the love she had for her sister, but she found a line she could not cross and instead leaped to a different line.

Another unique thing about this story is that it’s not your normal romance. Most stories with even a hint of romance spend a lot of time commenting on appearance and whether the characters find others attractive. In this case, there may have been a few passing comments but they almost all went unnoticed. Instead, this romance was built not on appearance but on understanding. The characters grew to understand and appreciate each other for who they were, but it was so carefully done that it almost escaped my notice until the end and it was a very happy surprise.

I loved the transformation of Ayama as her story progressed and how the beastly prince played a subtle role in her transformation. At first it was quiet, the author distracted with beautiful imagery and the stories that Ayama told, but the louder Ayama got the more apparent that her character was changing until the very end. And all it took was for one person to listen to her and showed that they actually cared about what she said, which sends a very powerful message. Just by listening to the ideas of a person you give them the power to fully realize themselves, especially if it is an individual who has spent most of their time being ignored. So next time someone is spilling to you their ideas and inner most thoughts just give them your undivided attention and see where they go.

The Too-Cleaver Fox

Again, I liked that this story focused on a character that was ugly and treated poorly for it, but also cleaver and helpful towards others. This one was vastly different than its predecessor in both tone and direction. There’s not a whole lot I can say about this story without giving anything away, but it was still very interesting though not as moving as the last one. Instead, this was a simple tale about an ugly fox trying to save the forest, even though most poked at his appearance, from a silent and impossibly deadly hunter.

This one almost fooled me, but I saw the plot twist before it was revealed in the end. That’s not saying that the author did a poor job with the twist, it was just something that I picked up as I read the fox’s reasons, thoughts, and interpretations. If I hadn’t noticed the smaller details then I might have been surprised, but even though I wasn’t the reveal was still pretty intense and had been gripping the pages as I read.

I really enjoyed the fox’s character. He was a bit of a trickster, but he always followed through on his word and he had a good heart. It was different because too often people write tricksters that either resemble Puck or Loki, but the fox while very cunning also did things for the greater good even at the expense of himself.

The Witch of Duva

Out of all the short stories, this one surprised me the most and for the first time in a while I was truly shocked by the outcome of a story.

This one felt like it drew some from the Hansel and Gretel story but only just barely. There were two children and their wood-carving father, a witch in the woods, and tasty treats but that was about it. The rest of the story either drew from other versions of the folktale that I’m unfamiliar with or came straight from the author herself. All the details that author added to the story made it come to life in a way that distracted me from all the little details pointing to the climax of the tale.

Sometimes there are just clear cut antagonists in a story, but here the antagonist was not actually the villain which also made this story unique. Let me explain, an antagonist is a character that antagonizes the protagonist and pushes them in a specific direction. However, not all antagonists are villains. For instance, in Ponyo, Ponyo’s father is her antagonist because through his actions he pushes her to rebel and try to become human, he isn’t the villain, thought, because all of his actions were meant to protect her and not harm her. And in The Witch of Duva, there is a case of a clear antagonist character and an unclear villain, which led to my surprise and love for this story.

Little Knife

This was truly an interesting story that had an ending that, while not surprising, took me a while to realize. It was unique because it ended with two characters that you might not expect at first glance and it ended in a rather quiet affair compared to the rest of the story.

It always bothered me to read stories in which the hero/heroine has to win the hand of their partner. Most of the time the partner does not like the idea or the hero/heroine at first, but they grow to love the other as the challenges go on. That just always annoyed me because I would never want my partner to go through the trials of Heracles to prove their love for me, because there are simpler things that have such a greater impact and mean more to me. Which is why I liked Little Knife, because through the whole ordeal Yeva keeps questioning the logic behind her father’s trials to find her a husband. I also enjoyed this story because the winner is someone you least expect, but someone Yeva chooses.

What I liked most about this story is something that I can’t actually talk a lot about without giving anything away. But I will say that I enjoyed the quiet ending because it was different but not unexpected due to the nature of the story. Pay close attention and you’ll see why this is one of my most favorite endings in all of my reading experience.

The Soldier Prince:

This one took me a little longer to read than the others, not because it was boring or because the pacing was too slow. No, I think the pacing was quite fine and I enjoyed the build-up for The Soldier Prince, but there was a lot more backstory to process for this one that I decided to take my time on it (also didn’t help that a new game that I had been waiting for a year for came out right when I started this story). This story also had a lot of imagery that I wanted to take my time in imagining for myself. Normally, the level of imagery in this story would’ve been too much for me but the author handled it rather well because she was describing the imaginings of a child, which tend to be rather grand for one of the character’s upbringing. Some people may have issues with the pacing in this one, but it does pick up once the story moves to the present setting.

While reading The Soldier Prince, I couldn’t help but think back to The Nutcracker which I’m quite sure is where the author drew some of her inspirations for this story. I always ran hot and cold on The Nutcracker, it never quite felt right to me. But I enjoyed The Soldier Prince because I felt like it had a more natural ending than the story of its inspiration. There are romantic elements in this tale but that is not the focus, the focus in the need and want for freedom, something that is different from what you’ve always known. For some people, it’s to travel the world and go where the wind blows. For others it’s to get lost in their imaginings and create something they think is better than their own reality. For others still, it’s to find out who they really are without the words of others telling them.

The best part of this story is how different it ended and the message that it spoke. It was profound and thought-provoking. And at the end I had to simple sit back and let it all sink in.

When Water Sang Fire

This one I believe will be a hit or miss to a lot of people. It’s much longer than all the others and is written a bit differently as well. When Water Sang Fire is a story that had a lot of build-up, like the previous story but a bit more, before it got to the main point. The world building here is a bit different because it is heavily seeped in magic and a type of magic most readers may not be familiar with, so the author had to build this magical part of her world quickly but steadily as to not lose anyone along the way. This process of creating led to a slow start that may make some readers fell a bit dragged. Personally, I really enjoyed the world building in this story because it is much different than any of the mermaids I’ve run across in fiction. However, for those who want to get to the chase, it’ll read like a long incline up the hill, but once you get to the top the pacing really picks up and by the end you’ll be tripping over yourself to finish.

Everybody is familiar with The Little Mermaid and there are plenty of retellings of that tale, but most of them never explain how the sea witch becomes this villainous figure we all know her as. When Water Sang Fire is a story that finally gives readers a wonderful journey of how the sea witch came to be, and it’s one that is so sad and lonely that it may make you pity the sea witch. I know that by the end, I felt terrible for Ulla and the life that was thrust upon her but she willingly chose.

Of all of the stories this is the longest but most beautifully written. The author did a wonderful job creating this magical setting and the characters that lived there while also moving the story along. Some of the magic may be confusing to some readers, but if you pay attention and take your time it should make itself clear. Also, some of the characterizations of the main characters seemed to be a little forced to make Ulla the more sympathetic character. I’m not saying that she doesn’t deserve sympathy, but some of the actions of the other characters don’t quite make sense to me based on their behavior leading up to that point. Otherwise it’s a beautifully told story that brings more personality to a two dimensional character a lot of us have known since we were kids.

Final Thoughts:

Overall I loved how beautifully these stories were woven together. None of them overlap with each other and each tale has a new set of characters to follow, but the author does a wonderful job bringing these characters to life and make you care for each of them within so few pages. Each place and character is a bit different from the other, but the one thing that remained the same was the theme of each story being that not everything is as it seems. Some of the stories show this theme very clearly, in some of the others you have to sift through to the very end to see it. Overall I think this is the best book that I’ve read in a while, not saying that the previous ones were bad, but the craft of this book was amazing. From the characters to the places, it read as if there was actual magic in each word and picture. I’m not sure how the author normally writes, but her stories here read like actual folktales told around a fire, they were lyrical with a smooth flow that took you straight to the end.

Also, the illustrations were phenomenal. Sara Kipin did a wonderful job bringing the stories to life through her illustrations. If you pay close enough attention, you can see how the illustrated outlines told the story as they went, adding little details from the story on every page. And the final pictures at the end of each story made me stare at them in wonder for minutes at a time before I went to the next one. If I could, I would totally by the illustrations loose so that I could get them framed and on my walls. The style, the colors, the details were just all so breathtaking and I want to show them to everyone.

Rating:

Overall, this was a wonderful collection of beautifully told stories with illustrations to match! Most of them are quick reads that you can finish in a single sitting without losing any of the magic or feeling too rushed. Each story is different and the book offers a diverse cast of characters that you can connect with. I would recommend this story to anyone who finds themselves in a reading slump or loves fairytale retellings!

Ayama and the Thorn Woods: 5

Ayama and the beastly prince stole my heart. A tale of two outcasts, hated and ignored for what they were born as, come together in the most spectacular way and help the other out unknowingly. This was romance I didn’t know I needed until I found it. It’s definitely a story about embracing who you are and the importance of listening to the inner thoughts and ideas of others. You never know how much such listening can transform a person.

The Too-Cleaver Fox: 4

While simple and not quite like the stories it’s sandwiched between, it’s still an interesting tale about a trickster trying to do what was best for the greater good. This story was unique for its portrayal of its fox character. Normally trickster characters, and especially foxes, are handled like Puck or Loki. However, here the fox while cunning and sly, never goes back on his word and does what he can to help others.

The Witch of Duva: 5

My favorite of all the short stories here. This is a haunting tale that will send shivers down your spine and make you sit at the edge of your seat. Beautifully written and wonderfully unexpected ending. This is definitely the Hansel and Gretel story I needed as a child.

Little Knife: 4

Of all of the stories in this book, I would have to say that this one is my least favorite. There is nothing wrong with this story. In fact, it is a quick and quaint read that I would recommend to everyone. But when compared to all the other stories here this one just doesn’t hold the same magic and beautiful story telling like the others did. It’s still a good story that I feel a lot of people will like, it just has superior company.

The Soldier Prince: 4.5

This one is definitely one to take your time one because it spans a vast amount of time and jumps around between a few of the characters. The build-up is slow, but the imagery and the life the author breaths into this story are fantastic. Like The Witch of Duva this is a creepy and eerie tale that’ll give you goosebumps!

When Water Sang Fire: 4.5

This one is the longest of all of the short stories and it has the longest build-up too. There’s a lot of world building and time spent understanding the magic of this story that might lose some of the readers. I believed that the pacing was just right, but others may not agree and think it’s too slow before you get to the ‘good’ stuff. Overall, it’s an interesting story full of magic and heartbreak.

Graphic Novel Review: Princeless – Raven: The Pirate Princess (vol.1)

Synopsis:

SET SAIL FOR REVENGE!

Fresh off her adventures in the pages of Princeless, Raven is ready to set out on her quest for revenge against her brothers. They’ve stolen everything that should be hers and now she’s going to get it back. But first, she needs a crew. Share the laughs, action, and adventure as Raven assembles the fearless crew of awesome ladies who will help her get her revenge.

First Thought:

The other week was the biggest sale of the year at our local comic book store, so along with grabbing our comics I decided to pick up a trade too. I had seen the Princeless series before but never from the beginning, and I’m quite lazy about tracking down trades. But I saw this one in the story and noticed that it was a first volume, so I thought that this was as good as anywhere too start. I like pirates and I like girl empowering comics, so what’s there to lose?

Overall Thoughts and Opinions:

I wasn’t expecting much from this volume, I try going into something new with little expectations, but I still felt disappointed by Raven the Pirate Princess. They advertised that this was going to be a funny action-packed adventure, but all the jokes fell flat or weren’t funny to begin with and the action jut ended up being little blips on the radar.

The characters felt artificial, like the author had a check list on their desk as they wrote the story. “Big” butch girl who dresses like a man, check. Punk chick with a face full of metal and a half shaved head, check. Father who is trying to raise his daughter right but in all the wrong ways and throws in weird sexist remarks that don’t fit his overall character, check. Young black girl how has to be stubborn and doesn’t care for before mentioned father, check. Tough Asian girl that has to do everything for herself, check. A bunch of women who generally hate men, check. A bunch of men that have no respect for women and don’t view them as equals, check. Check. Oh bloody check! Like it’s fine to have those characters, but I’ve that list or something similar in a lot of other stories at the moment and it gets so boring to read. The characters in Raven the Pirate Princess barely have personalities outside of their labels. I understand that this is just the first volume, but only one of those characters really grabbed me and the others just felt like old lukewarm water. The majority of the characters didn’t make me feel like I wanted to continue reading about their stories.

There actually wasn’t much in this volume that made me want to continue reading. The premise sounded pretty promising but nothing really happened in this volume. The most action is in the first chapter, the second chapter has an unnecessary bar fight, and the last chapter has a tense scene that gets solved with a stupid plan that just showed that all men are stupid. Really that was just the whole idea of this story, that men are all sexist and racist and total screw-ups and only women can do things right, which as a woman I found to be terribly boring and toxic to read. All my life the majority of the people who told me that I wasn’t pretty enough, that I was fat or needed to lose weight, or that I wasn’t smart enough to go into math and science were women. My father has always supported me and my education and has cheered me on from the beginning, making sure that I got my hands on anything that could help me learn more. My partner has gotten into arguments with women who have told me that I wasn’t good enough, he even defends me against myself from the internalized abuse that I learned from an early age. So I get defensive when books, comic, and other media portray all men to be careless, sexist, abusive jerks that can’t get anything right when it’s been older women and girls my own age who have been all those things to me. I think it’s great to get more stories out there about take charge women in generally male dominated roles, or stories in general that empower women. I draw the line when they start bashing men and create male characters from overblown stereotypes. It would’ve been fine if they had a few male characters like that, but almost every male character that was given dialogue was some sort of offensive caricature, and the few who weren’t still had some out of place dialogue that was sexist in some way. The characters they were portraying were just strawmen, and I have a hard time believing that out of an entire town there is only one good male character—come on! End Rant.

While reading this I also wasn’t sure who their audience was. Sure there’s media out there that can be enjoyed by all age groups, but that’s because it contains content that entertains all ages. This story is marketed to 9 year olds and up. Sure, what 9 year old wouldn’t like to read about an all-girl pirate crew? However, almost all of the “bold” statements made in this volume would go right over a kid’s head or they would misinterpret the messages. Yes, there are things like positive body image and it’s okay to be into classically ‘geeky/nerdy’ things, but all the heavy handed comments are things older people will understand and this volume is soaked in them. There’s no even balance, and there’s not even enough action to hold a lot of kids’ interests—I mean I had a hard time staying motivated till the end and it’s only three chapters.

Last thing, this story is marketed as a fantasy but I feel like it just barely made it into this category because it’s lower than the average low fantasy story. For instance, all the characters speak as if they belonged to our present day and about current ‘issues’. Now, in other fantasies these issues would be changed in a way to fit the setting so that they can be seen as similar to us but still not a direct parallel. In Raven the Pirate Princess, they don’t even bother making anything different in the slightest bit. Even some of the clothes and mannerisms are things we’d see in our everyday lives, like a few of the characters have distinctly plastic looking glasses that you can get from Walmart and one character looks exactly like a mother that would ask for a manager. I know that’s very nitpicky, but it’s also very distracting and makes the story and art look sloppy. And the only fantasy things mentioned in the story are a goofy dragon that we never meet and a character that claims to be half-elf, “I got all the good parts—height, speed, the looks—just without the pointy ears” *cough*Mary-Sue*cough-cough*. And overall the world building is just lazy. The story takes a lot of common day things for us, like board games, third-wave feminism, LARP, and D&D, and place it in a non-descript setting with a few kings somewhere that all lock their daughters in towers to be saved. Maybe it’s because I never found and read the first series, but the world in this story is lazily crafted and full of cardboard cut-outs.

Ratings:

Art: 3

The art was okay. It wasn’t the best but it was far from the worst. The characters and detailing are very simplistic in design, though at times there were some issues with continuity. I didn’t like some of the character designs because they looked too modern or really out of place for no reason. The detailing is very simple, showing only the idea of patterns and the like. Sometimes I felt like the settings were too bland and unimpressive, but that might just be for my taste. The coloring was okay, nothing gorgeous. A lot of the panels have a very red pallet, which didn’t always make sense because it didn’t match with the lighting and I felt like it washed out some of the characters at times. There are a few places were the coloring gets really sloppy with noticeable areas with color outside of the lines or distinct white areas that don’t belong. I will say that each character design is very unique, too bad they just couldn’t translate that into their personalities.

Story: 2

I did not care for this storyline and I have no real interest to read further. The premise of the story sounded promising, but after all the heavy-handed comments and the blatant man bashing I just can’t. I felt disgusted by a lot of the comments that were made, by both the male and female characters, but mostly I hated how the female characters acted. The dialogue was terrible; there were times that the characters didn’t need to speak and other times when it just sounded too campy and fake. There was one character that I liked above all the others, but I doubt she’ll get much panel time in this story. The humor fell flat for me, I don’t even think that I laughed once, and the action was just boring and full of unnecessary dialogue.

Overall: 2

I’d recommend this story to anyone who likes the more recent waves of feminism or who want a story that has a sprinkling of fantasy. I would also recommend this to anyone who wants a diverse cast, the diversity here is pretty good though completely one-sided. Some kids may enjoy Raven the Pirate Princess, but I think the bigger fan base will be of the high school-college ages. If you’re a fan of fantasy don’t pick this up, you’ll be disappointed. As for me, if I find the next volume at a tremendous discounted price I might pick it up, otherwise this wasn’t worth my money.

Details:

Title: Princeless-Raven: The Pirate Princess

Volume: 1- Captain Raven and the All-Girl Pirate Crew

Issue(s): 1-3

Publisher: Action Lab Entertainment

Writer(s): Jeremy Whitley

Illustrator: Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt

Colors Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt

Letters: Rosy Higgins and Ted Brandt

Released Date: January 26th, 2016

Pages: 128

Genre(s): Young Adult, Fantasy (loosely), Comedy, Action/Adventure

 

Manga Review: That Wolf-Boy is Mine! (vol.4)

 

Synopsis:

LOST LOVE?

Just as Komugi and Yū’s feelings begin to reach one another, Komugi is confronted by Yata-sensei. Afterwards, she’s not the same, and drifts through her everyday life while Yū can only watch over her from afar. But…in the depths of Komugi’s memory, a familiar voice calls for her. Can the bonds she’s built with Yū and the gang overcome the sensei’s powers? And what will the future bring for the animal spirits living in Komugi’s world?

Overall Thoughts/Opinions:

3/5

The ending was bitter sweet to me. It was sweet because this story ends on a happy note. But it’s bitter because I felt like there was still more to tell and I felt like the mangaka took the easy way out of the situation they created. I’m also disappointed, with how the last volume ended I thought that there would be a lot more gut-wrenching drama that would make me squirm in my seat. Instead, it felt like it flat lined between the end of volume 3 to the first page of volume 4. Everything was too convenient in a way that made it seem unrealistic. I know, that’s kinda stupid sounding for someone to say about a story of supernatural qualities, but everything else about the story should be as realistic as possible so that the reader doesn’t get pulled out of the story for a minor/major discrepancy in the reality you’ve created. At least for me, when a story already has weird elements if reality, for instance the laws of nature, doesn’t function properly it pulls me out of the story and from my experience is mostly due to author laziness more than anything. That’s it, the ending to this story felt lazy and too rushed which also made it feel inorganic, like the mangaka meant to do more but couldn’t.

I think my favorite part of this volume is the bonus story at the end. It’s a cute, but sad story from Senri’s past that really explains his character. After reading it, I feel like his character has more depth than any of the other’s in this story, which is a shame because he didn’t get much attention in the main story!

Note: Expect a review of the series as a whole soon!

Details:

Title: That Wolf-Boy is Mine! (Vol. 4)

Chapters: 14-final chapter, plus a bonus story

Written by: Yoko Nogiri

Artist:  Yoko Nogiri

Translation/Adaptation: Alethea and Athena Nibley

Publisher:  Kodansha Comics

Published:  March 21st, 2017

Pages: 180

Genre: Manga, Shojo, Supernatural, Comedy, Romance

Manga Review: That Wolf-Boy is Mine! (vol.3)

 

Synopsis:

JUST FRIENDS

After Rin shares some profound insights with Komgi about her crush, she learns it’s easier to bottle up her feelings for the wolf-boy, Yū. As Komugi gets to really know Rin the fox, his cold exterior slowly melts away−and Yū can’t help but be concerned. In order to let someone new into his heart, Yū struggles to confront his emotional trauma from the past. But by the time Yū realizes his true emotions, something unthinkable has happened to Komugi…

Overall Thoughts/Opinions:

4/5

Oh my Lord, in heaven! That cliffhanger was really mean, like if I didn’t have the fourth volume already I would be screaming like a mad woman to the closest bookstore to buy it. If you can’t tell, the drama has really shot up in this volume and particularly near the end of it when a lot more of the plot is revealed. And the drama is getting so intense, but not in an uncomfortable way. Instead, I feel more like I’m about to fall out of my seat from sitting to close to the edge. I don’t normally like love triangles, mostly because they’re never done properly, but I really like how the love triangle is being used in this story. Unfortunately, I think the couple that I prefer isn’t going to happen….sigh, oh well!

Anyways, I feel like Komugi has come more to life in this volume but I still don’t think of her as a very present character. It’s really weird, I like her but I feel she’s still a bit watered down compared to the other characters in the story. Sometimes I feel like her two best friends have more of a presence than she does, but I digress.

The comedy, like before was good for a few chuckles in between some really heavy drama. Aoshi, the tanuki, is probably my favorite character because he’s the comic relief and such an instigator of a lot of the drama. Well, if you’d please excuse me, I have to devour the next volume before I die from that cliffhanger. Seriously, though if you haven’t read this volume yet buy it with volume four or you will regret it!!!

Details:

Title: That Wolf-Boy is Mine! (Vol. 3)

Chapters: 9-13

Written by: Yoko Nogiri

Artist:  Yoko Nogiri

Translation/Adaptation: Alethea and Athena Nibley

Publisher:  Kodansha Comics

Published:  January 10th, 2017

Pages: 176

Genre: Manga, Shojo, Supernatural, Comedy, Romance

Book Review: Heartbeat (Morta Fox #1)

Note: I got a free copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review, which reads as follows:

 

Synopsis:

When I first saw the monster hidden in the dark, teeth sharp and face covered in blood, the first thing I did was jump over Boston’s Wall of Protection to warn the people inside it. Turns out the people already knew, and all I did was turn myself into a delicious little snack for the most terrifying creature to have ever existed.

I was sure he’d kill me. He didn’t. Instead, he turned me into one of them.

Being saved against your own will is no fun, especially when the knight in shining armor is a vampire who calls himself Hammer. He’s arrogant, flirty, and even more stubborn than me. Left with no other choice but to make a deal with him, I soon find out that I’m not just your usual bloodsucker. I’m something far worse. But at least I’m no longer all alone.

Promises are not to be broken in my newfound world, and when my part of the deal is done, Hammer has seven days to complete his.

If he does, I will no longer be alive.

My First Thoughts:

The premise for this story sounded very interesting and I’m always looking for a good vampire story to read. Seriously, it’s hard to find good vampire fiction anymore which is a real shame. If you find the right vampire fiction it can be a whole bucket of angst and drama or a blood bath, anything else jut gets too boring or cliché.

Overall Thoughts/Opinions:

Warning: Mentions of attempted suicide, suicidal thoughts and tendencies, and attempted rape.

For the life of me I could not finish this story and it really upsets me. I really wanted to like this book and I really wanted to read it to the end because it reminded me of a bad movie that people still found enjoyable because of its flaws. Unfortunately, I lost all interest and will to read this book and could only read a few pages a sitting before I got bored or frustrated. So, for the sake of all the other books I need and/or want to read I’ve decided to put this one down and I don’t think I’m ever going to pick it up again. At nearly 20% of the way though the book I had to shelve it.

In the beginning of the story I was a bit intrigued. Dystopians can be hard for me to get into, so most of the time I stay away from them unless they have an interesting story. So far I had never run into a dystopian novel that also had vampires, so that acted as the initial hook for me. However, it kind of dropped from there.

The one thing that really made this story hard to read were all the plot holes that were just so glaringly obvious that it became frustrating. Morta made decisions that made absolutely no sense just so that the author could have her in the right place to progress the story. The author describes how vampires were created, which at first I thought it was clever until I really started thinking about it. The author used a virus to create vampires. When infected, the body’s organs all fail and stop working except for the brain, which needs blood to survive. At first, I thought it was an interesting idea but then I really started thinking about it. If the stomach is no longer functioning, then how does the blood get to the brain? When the blood is consumed it goes down the throat and to the stomach. First thought is that the new blood just gets absorbed into the blood stream and is taken to the brain. However, that’s not how things work. For something to get into the blood stream it must either be immediately be absorbed into muscles, directly supplied by injecting into a vain, or it must be digested by the stomach. If swallowed, blood to my knowledge can’t be absorbed into the muscles so it would have to be digested, if that’s possible, which it can’t be because the stomach is no longer functioning. Also, if the heart stops beating then how would the blood, if it could, get to the brain? The pumping of the heart is the main mechanism for blood circulation, so how does the new blood get to the brain if the heart isn’t beating? There were several other issues I had with the virus approach, but I’ll stop there and spare you from my rant.

The mistakes I found in this book made it obvious that this was a self-published piece. At first they were quite humorous. Occasionally the author would use the wrong verb, ex: “I heard the smell of blood…” Other times there were issues with continuity, one minute a character would be one thing and the next they were doing an action that completely contradicted what they had just done with no real mention of it. After a while the mistakes just kept piling up and it made the story a little hard to follow, all of which could have been avoid if there was an experienced editor involved with this story.

I think I could have gotten past all of the errors in this story, because they really were funny most of the time, if I even liked the characters I was following. I hated Morta and I liked Hammer only a smidgen more than her. Morta is a pessimistic, childish, and frustrating character. It was like the author didn’t want to make her a Mary Sue, or the perfect heroine, but in doing so made an unrealistic character that just became too annoying to even care for. She doesn’t want to be a monster so she tries to commit suicide. At least four times she tries to kill herself within the first few chapters after she becomes a vampire. She is so determined to die that she keeps doing things that may get her killed and honestly I can’t stand those characters. As someone who had to talk a friend out of suicide I was extremely uncomfortable with this and many times pissed with how the author handled it. I can’t imagine what someone who actually has attempted suicide would feel when reading this.

Like I said, Hammer was a little more likeable than Morta but not enough to make me care what happens to him. When you first meet him he’s a cocky show off who just tries to convince Morta to sleep with him. Ignoring the impossibility of vampire sex, it made him come off poorly because he kept insisting until Morta gave him a firm, hard refusal. After Morta told him no though, he dropped the subject completely and then it felt like he was a teacher mentoring a young bratty child which doesn’t scream romance to me. Also, outside those two main characters nine out of ten people were complete scum and completely unredeemable. For instance, for some reason the doctors Morta ran into in the beginning tried doing nonconsensual experiments for no immediate reason. Slightly later, when Morta leaves the city she is immediately set upon by a group of men that try to coerce her into having sex with them. Not even a chapter later another guy tries forcing her to have sex with him and no one tries to stop him. And of course, because it’s a dystopian all government officials and law enforcement are sadistic, murdering scum.

Rating:

I got about 19% of the way through this book and decided to quit. This book needs some serious editing work because it read like the first draft of a manuscript, before an editor takes their red pen to the pages and make them bleed. The characters are unlikable. There are plot holes everywhere that distract from the story. The word building is lazy and reads like the author just took our reality and slapped a bunch of cheap stickers on it. I feel like I could have finished this book if I found that I had even a grain of compassion towards Morta and Hammer. Instead I doubt that I will ever pick this story up again. It’s possible that the story gets better from where I left off, but I have no motivation to find out.

I would recommend this story to anyone who likes dystopian or vampire stories, I feel like people should still give this book a try if they really want to. However, I must warn you that there are mentions of attempted suicide, suicidal thoughts and tendencies, and attempted rape. If you are someone who has any experience with suicide I seriously suggest staying away from this book because the main character only wants to die and attempts to kill herself several times. If these things don’t bother you, then by all means give this story a try if you really want to.

Details:

Title: Heartbeat (Morta Fox #1)

Author: D.N. Hoxa

Publisher: self-published

Release Date: October 16, 2016

Genre: Young Adult, Paranormal, Dystopia, Romance

Pages: 326

Manga Review: Yona of the Dawn (vol.2)

Details:

Title: Yona of the Dawn (Vol. 2)

Chapters: 6-11

Written by: Mizuho Kusanagi

Artist:  Mizuho Kusanagi

Translation/Adaptation: JN Produtions / Ysabet Reinhardt MacFarlane

Publisher:  VIZ Media LLC

Published:  October 4th, 2016

Pages: 192

Genre: Manga, Shojo, Fantasy, Action/Adventure, Romance

Synopsis:

Princess Yona lives an ideal life as the only princess of her kingdom. Doted on by her father, the king, and protected by her faithful guard Hak, she cherishes the time spent with the man she loves, Su-won. But everything changes on her 16th birthday when tragedy strikes her family!

While on the run, Yona and Hak head to Hak’s hometown, where she attempts to heal her broken heart. However, she can’t rest there for long once she discovers that Su-won may soon become king! What will Yona choose to do in the wake of this news?

Rating:

4/5

Right off the bat, this volume brings character development onto the table. For those who didn’t like Yona in the first volume, by the end of this volume I promise you’ll start to see her differently. The writer has done a fantastic job of subtly pushing her in a more active role in this story, and while she hasn’t taken charge yet, I believe that they’re setting her up to do that soon. Other characters get some development as well, though it’s still not clear what their motives are yet. By the end, I wasn’t quite sure what Hak’s motives are in this story, but I have a feeling that they’ll be relieved later on in a big ‘ta-da!’ moment. Other characters get introduced in this volume as well from the various other tribes within the kingdom, though mostly from the wind and fire tribes. The wind tribe characters offer a lot of comic relief for the story and they’re portrayed as easy going, but fierce warriors. The fire tribe characters seem to be setting up to be minor villains for the story, they’re portrayed as hard, scheming individuals.

The action in this volume went up a step. It’s still not as graphic as other mangas that I’ve read, but there’s enough detail to get the point across and still make the fight scenes enjoyable to read. The tone for this volume is pretty serious, though there is some light hearted comedy that give3s you a brief moment of relief before diving right back in. All-in-all I really enjoyed this volume and I was left with quite a cliffhanger that I need to remedy like now!