Manga Review: Fruits Basket: Collector’s Edition (Vol. 2)

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Title: Fruits Basket: Collector’s Edition (Vol. 2)

Chapters: 13-24

Written by: Natsuki Takaya

Artist: Natsuki Takaya

Translation/Adaptation: Sheldon Drzka

Lettering: Lys Blakeslee

Publisher: Yen Press

Published: June 2016

Pages: 384

Genre: Manga, Romance, Young Adult, Shojo Manga

Synopsis:

When she was living in a tent pitched on the Sohma family’s land, Tohru Honda’s primary concerns were dirt and slugs. But now that she’s living with the Sohmas, magical powers and ancient curses are the order of the day! With Yuki and Kyo at each other’s throats like cats and… rats, life at the Sohmas’ is lively enough, but it all heats up as Hatsuharu joins the fray, spoiling for a fight! And even before the new school year can get underway, the mystery surrounding the family escalates when Akito, head of the Sohma clan, confronts Tohru without warning…

Overall Thoughts/Opinions:

4/5

Once again, this volume of Furuba is very introductory. We’re introduced to several more characters, including two of my favorites, Hatsuharu and Ayame, and the hijinks only seem to escalate. This volume also includes our first encounter with the head of the Sohma family, Akito, who all the members of the Sohma family seem to fear. We start to dive into the troubled pasts of the Sohma family members, as well as the complicated relationships that bind them all together. We also see Tohru’s relationship with Kyo and Yuki get stronger, and we see more examples of just how devoted Tohru’s best friends, Arisa Uotani and Saki Hanajima, are to her.

I honestly love every volume of Furuba that I have read, but this volume is one where we start getting into why I find this series so good. While we’re still being introduced to characters and crazy, hilarious things are still happening to them, we are also starting to see the more dramatic, more serious turn that this series is going to take. I find this series is so reflective of life and real relationships. It starts out very superficial and steadily gets deeper, just like any friendship (normally) works.

This is also the only volume that I feel qualified to truly judge the new translation, since volume 4 of the original release is included in this volume of the collector’s edition, and it is the only one of the original release I ever actually owned. I really like the new translation! I feel everything that was changed was changed to make more sense, but all of the changes are really minor. According to a review I read online, “the inaccuracies from the Japanese still haven’t been fixed,” but since I don’t read Japanese and never knew that the translations were inaccurate to begin with, I really couldn’t care less. Translations are never truly accurate, anyway. They just follow the gist of the story, and this one is still telling the story that I loved long ago.

Blogger Note: Please don’t forget that we are also involved with Inkitt’s Novel Writing Contest! It was announced recently by Jessica in this post. If you’re interested in entering the contest or want to read more about it, you can do so here!

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Manga Review: Kimi ni Todoke (from me to you) (vol.2)

kimi-ni-todoke-vol2Details:

Title: Kimi ni Todoke (From me to you) (vol.2)

Chapters: 4-7

Story by: Karuho Shiina

Artist: Karuho Shiina

Translation/Adaptation: JN Productions

Publisher: VIZ Media LLC

Published: October 6th 2009

Pages: 187

Genre: Manga, Shojo, Romance, Slice of Life, Young Adult

Synopsis:

Rumors start flying about Sadako’s new friends claiming that Yano’s been around the block and Yoshida’s a former gang member. And the source of all this tattle? Sadako herself! Will Sadako retreat to her former life as a loner because of a simple misunderstanding?!

Rating:

5/5

This volume is basically the continuation and the finish of the mini story started in the last volume (~chapter 3). It was beautiful; I loved reading every single page! There’s a lot of character growth for Sadako, who realizes that she can’t just go back to how she was, and that communication is key in all friendships. We get to see a lot more from Yoshida and Yano as they try to figure out what all of this means, stumbling to the realization Sadako meant more to them than they thought. They’re characters get even more fleshed out from chapter to chapter, allowing you to clearly see the difference between the two. There’s a lot of heart and crying in this volume, it’s so beautiful to read and reflect on, and the lessons learned here can be applied to your own relationships!

There’s no real cliffhanger at the end of this volume. There’s a possible peak into who might be the story’s new antagonist, but nothing for sure. This volume is a nice wrap up to the drama presented at the end of volume 1. Final note, I love reading the little blurbs from the author/creator! Her thoughts and stories are so interesting to read about, especially her explanation of one of the events in this volume.