Book Review: Carve the Mark

imageDetails:
Title: Carve the Mark
Author: Veronica Roth
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Release Date: January 17, 2017
Genre: Science Fiction
Pages: 438

Synopsis:

In a galaxy powered by the current, everyone has a gift.

Cyra is the sister of the brutal tyrant who rules the Shotet people. Cyra’s currentgift gives her pain and power—something her brother exploits, using her to torture his enemies. But Cyra is much more than just a blade in her brother’s hand, she is resilient, quick on her feet, and smarter than he knows.

Akos is the son of a farmer and an oracle from the frozen nation-planet of Thuvhe. Protected by his unusual currentgift, Akos is generous in spirit, and his loyalty to his family is limitless. Once Akos and his brother are captured by enemy Shotet soldiers, Aks is desperate to get this brother out alive—no matter what the cost. Then Akos is thrust into Cyra’s world, and the enmity between their countries and families seems insurmountable. Will they help each other to survive, or will they destroy one another?

Carve the Mark is Veronica Roth’s stunning portrayal of the power of friendship—and love—in a galaxy filled with unexpected gifts.

My First Thoughts:

I was really excited to hear that Veronica Roth had written a new book, because I absolutely loved the Divergent series. However, I’ve been hearing awful things about the book, not about the plot, but about the characters and racial relations. I walked into this series trying to have an open mind, but also trying to be aware of the criticisms that I had heard.

Overall Thoughts/Opinion:

I’m unsure about those criticisms that I heard… I find it hard to whitewash or portray a negative bias toward characters whose physical descriptions consist of “can see his veins through his skin,” and “has dark shadows crisscrossing over her body,” or “large and lean,” and “small and fast.” Also, everything in this book takes places on a planet that is not Earth, they aren’t even referred to as humans at any point, so I feel like that is also a point against the criticisms that I had been hurting.
That’s not to say that racism and classism are not heavily explored themes in the book. There are two primary races featured in the book, the Thuvhe and the Shotet.

The Thuvhe are a race that exists on a frozen planet and believes in peace and love and the power of the the current, while the Shotet are a race looked down upon by the entire space system as violent scavengers due to their traditions and practices. Much of the book is spent with the main characters, Cyra and Akos, learning the truth about each other’s culture and seeing the beauty in the cultures that are not their own.

This book was a little more on the “Space Opera” side of science fiction than hard science fiction that has a lot of scientific explanation, which is awesome because that is more of what I am interested in and enjoy. I don’t need to know how it works in too much detail, I just need to understand that it does. I was drawn in by the characters of the series, captivated by the elements of the world, and I never felt stunted by the plot of the book. This book is 438 pages and has a standard sized font and I finished it in just a couple days.

Final Thoughts:

I really enjoyed this book. I thought it was a cool story, I thought the cultures were diverse and fleshed out, there was no point where I felt anyone was one-dimensional, and I never felt like I was being told everything going on. It was a cool story that pulled at my heart strings several times and kept me engaged throughout.

Rating(s):

4/5

I really did enjoy this book. I would recommend it to anyone who has a budding interest in science fiction, or simply is interested in a “where two worlds collide” type of story. I am excited to read the next installation of this story.

Related Reviews/Books:

COMING SOON!!!